Fujifilm

Adventures in: renting camera equipment by Nigel Rumsey

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For the first time, I decide to rent some gear for a shoot. In the past, I'd always managed to borrow what I needed or get by with what I had. But there's only so long you can live off of the generosity of others. Conventional wisdom says you don’t buy the gear you’re only going to use occasionally, it’s better to rent what you need. If you find you're using it a lot, then you buy.

I used to be a Project Manager, where you quickly learn, that if your plans can go wrong they generally will.

So I contact a local 'professional' dealer who's handily about a mile from the venue. I was going to be a bit pushed for time the week of the gig so I arrange to pick up on the way there, allowing me to drop it back a couple of days later. I need a Fuji camera body and a lens (an XT1 and a 16-55mm f2.8, if you're interested). I assume they probably won’t hold as much Fuji stock as the more popular Canon or Nikon, so I book nice and early. I'm all set, quite excited by this new way of working.

I used to be a Project Manager, where you quickly learn, that if your plans can go wrong they generally will. With this in mind, I make a note to call a month before the date. “Hi, I’m just checking on my booking.” “OK, let me just look for you ....., oh, sorry Sir, we’ve got it down for the wrong date,” they say. “But don’t worry, I’ll change that for you now. There all done, see you on the 21st.”

My Project Manager cautiousness steps up a gear. I schedule another call for a week before the date. “Hi, I’m sure it’s all fine (patently not true, or I wouldn't be calling), I’m just checking on my booking for the 21st?” “21st, let me see here. XT1 body…” (drawn out pause). “What date was it Sir?" “The 21st, I phoned”, (twice as it happens) “and you said it was all ok?" I then launch into this slightly out-of-control stuttering repetition of my name and the date like some down-market DJ. "Rumsey, on the 21st, 21st, Rumsey, 21st..." "That's strange Sir, we don’t seem to have a record of it, but don’t worry I’ll book it for you now.” I’m just on the verge of pointing out that I’ve already booked it when he says.. “Oh, I’m afraid that body’s already booked for the 21st". Yes, by me! Twice!

I can hear myself sounding like a dick.

I do my best to explain that I booked it first before the other booking, that should be my name on the list, not theirs. But I can hear myself sounding like a dick. After all, it’s not the other guy’s fault and it's obvious my arguments aren't going to cut any ice anyway. “I can do you the XT-10, but it’s a little more expensive.” At this point I’m resigned to my fate, I don't even ask how renting a cheaper camera can be more expensive. My options have run out, I need a camera. No, I need this camera. "Yes," I say, "that'll be fine."

The logic behind renting the same camera as you already use is a sound one, all the buttons are in the same place, it's just muscle memory. So much for that plan. However, the shoot goes fine, I don’t use the rented body that much anyway.

My question dear reader, is what do you do? Have I just been unlucky? Does renting gear need to be this difficult? How many times do you need to use a piece of gear to make it worth buying - at the moment, for me, that number is two.

Record Store Day 2016 by Nigel Rumsey

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Beyond getting to see some new bands I like to start Record Store Day with a vinyl release to search for, even if my track record in actually finding it isn’t great. In the past this has included Radiohead’s 2011 12” release of 'The Butcher and Supercollider' and in 2014 Tame Impala’s, 'Live Versions'. You guessed it, I didn’t get either. This year was likely to be no easier. The object of my desire was The White Stripes highly regarded Peel Sessions, 15 years after recording they had been pressed into vinyl for the first time. Two disks, one white, one red. Reports on twitter said record stores had received their allocation only hours before they closed the night before RSD.

Rock couple in Rough Trade East

I’d planned a route through east London which would take me past three shops ending at London’s Record Store Day ground zero, Rough Trade East. Rough Trade regularly host in-store gigs and had booked a day of bands and DJs. The real pleasure of RSD for me is not what might be for sale, it’s the chance of catching an amazing set by an artist I’d never before heard of. Even if the music isn’t my taste there’s something about ‘the new’ that’s captivating.

Inside of Love Vinyl record shop

My route starts at Love Vinyl, just off of the Kingsland Road. They have a good selection of RSD pressings, but hadn’t received any of the White Stripes. One of the staff tell me an early customer had spent over £800 - that's a whole lot of vinyl. I speak to a group of friends outside who are frantically calling trying to track down a copy of The Slaves 'Are You Satisfied'. RSD can get you like that, especially if your favourite artist is involved. If you’re not careful a sense of panic can set in, do I go there or that other store which is closer but may be busier - what to do?

Sister Ray Ace on Record Store Day 2016

My next opportunity is Sister Ray Ace further down the Essex Road, coffee was calling me but now is no time to be taking breaks. As Sister Ray comes into sight I see there's a queue, my heart sinks, but maybe that means there’s something worth queuing for - a little Jack maybe! Things are very organised, a girl at the door is letting a small number of punters in at a time. Even though it wasn’t on their list I still have to ask, but Jack is nowhere to be seen.

Two bearded men in Rough Trade East

..they’d received three copies of the White Stripes all of which were sold within 15 minutes of opening. Jack White had left the building.

I pull myself up, don’t lose hope now. I push on through the now drizzly east London. Left on to Bethnal Green Road, my brain’s begging for coffee, but Jack might be alone and waiting for me! Flashback Records comes into sight - no queue - that’s a good sign right? I get inside to be confronted by a scene reminiscent of the morning after a really good student party. There are a couple of forlorn souls searching for the vinyl equivalent of an old bottle of cooking sherry at the back of the kitchen cabinet. The staff are looking slightly stunned by the morning's events. A sympathetic guy explains they’d received three copies of the White Stripes all of which were sold within 15 minutes of opening. Jack White had left the building (sorry for that).

The queue to get into Rough Trade East on Record Store Day 2016

Record Store Day 2016 ends the same way as it had every other year, without the main prize. I walk along Brick Lane to Rough Trade, I knew any copies they’d had would be well gone by now. I can't help but ask never-the-less.

Chilean duo Magaly Fields playing Rough Trade East

On the bright side, I saw Chilean duo Magaly Fields who were new to me play a really stonking set. I also caught a DJ set by Blanck Mass - a bit too discordant for my taste but plenty of people were enjoying it.

Next year I’m sure I’ll be doing the same. Probably with the same lack of success - but still full of hope.

Full Gas Track Cycling: take two by Nigel Rumsey

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I had the opportunity to return to the Lee Valley velodrome for the last meet of the Full Gas Winter Track Series. The previous meet had to be abandoned following a serious accident, so it was good to see a full evening of racing. I’d been so inspired by Henri Cartier-Bresson’s iconic shots at the Vélodrome D’Hiver, Paris in the 1950’s I decided to have a go at shooting film once I had some digital shots in the can.

An official rings the last lap bell in track cycle race.

A cyclist warming up at Lee Valley velodrome.A manual focus 35mm lens isn’t the obvious choice for high-speed sports photography, however the good thing about track cycling is that, within a few inches, you can predict what line the leaders are going to take. I pre-focused on my chosen spot and tried to hold my nerve.

I’ve only a few rolls of Neopan 1600 remaining, sadly like so many great films it’s no longer manufactured, so I limited myself to one roll - 36 shots.

track racing at Lee Valley velodrome

I pre-focused on my chosen spot and tried to hold my nerve.

A track cyclist waiting to enter the track.The images here are a mix of film and digital but on balance I think I prefer the feel of the film. They’re not up to Cartier-Bresson standards but in my defence there aren't many photographers who are.

Members of the Velociposse womens team waiting to race.

Track cycling at the Olympic Velodrome by Nigel Rumsey

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A couple of weeks ago I got the opportunity to shoot one of the Full Gas Winter Track Series events that take place at what was the London Olympic velodrome, now the Lee Valley velopark. It’s impossible to stand in the centre of the beautiful wooden track without imagining the atmosphere, in the heat of the 2012 summer, as the home crowd cheer Laura Trott, Chris Hoy, Victoria Pendleton et al on to Gold Medal winning victory. Track cycle racing at the London Olympic velodrome.

However, it’s a very different place on this cold, damp Tuesday evening in February. There are far more people in the centre of the track than outside, except for the odd supporting spouse and parent, the stands are all but empty.

The times these competitors are putting in maybe slower and many are certainly older than their Olympic counterparts, but the passion is no less real. It takes a lot of commitment to drive to this rather bleak, incredibly busy, corner of North London after a day at work only to don a lycra bodysuit and push yourself to the edge of exhaustion.

A track cyclist waiting to race at the London Olympic velodrome.

What you don’t realise, as the casual observer, is quite how dangerous it can be. I spent most of the first race doing my best to get my photographic eye in and realising quite how fast these group ‘C’ amateurs were travelling.

The group ‘B’ warm up gave me a second chance to get some shots of the racing when, after only a few laps and a touch of wheels, there were suddenly a number of riders on the ground.

Two track cyclists after being involved in a crash.

At first it seemed like the opportunity to get another perspective on the racing. It soon became obvious that two riders received more than scrapes and bruises. One received a nasty cut to his head, another landed on the wrong side of the barrier amongst the, luckily absent, spectator’s seats and was more seriously injured.

An injured track cyclist being attended on the track.

After some time the rider with bleed was taken away by ambulance and the more seriously injured rider by air ambulance. I understand both have now been released from hospital to hopefully ride again.

The prizes may not be the same as those awarded to the Olympians but the dangers are just as real.

An injured track cyclist with a bandaged leg.

I've had the opportunity to return and fortunately see more racing and no accidents, I'll post some shots as soon as I've had a chance to edit them.

Fujifilm x-series JPEG files by Nigel Rumsey

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  Having read recently read Kevin Mullins' article detailing how he set the custom film profiles on his Fujifilm X-series cameras I was keen to give it a go on my new Fuji XT1. Although I've been shooting with my X100s for some time it's mainly been in RAW.

Fujifilm X-T1 jpeg file of a cup of coffee in Tap Coffee, London.

I was in Soho yesterday and decided to forgo the RAW, shoot JPEG and see how they came out. Let me be the first to say none of these are going to win any awards but they give a good cross-section of lighting situations.

Fujifilm X-T1 jpeg file of a patisserie shop worker admiring his wares

The commonly accepted wisdom is that JPEG files just don't give the necessary flexibility in editing.

By virtue of the fact a RAW file includes all the available data and a JPEG doesn't, then the RAW file has to be the safer way to shoot. However do we always need that additional data?

If I'm shooting for a client then, yes, I'm going to buy the insurance of a RAW file. But if I'm just shooting some street photography as I wander Soho on a Saturday afternoon, then on the evidence of these shots, for me, JPEG is good enough.

Fujifilm X-T1 jpeg file of a darkly light London street scene

Kevin details how he sets his custom settings in his post. I found when I used his settings on my X100s I was losing all the detail in the blacks. As the XT1 has the same sensor as the Fuji X100s I decided to back off the shadow settings a little. These are the settings I used:

Black & white (using the B&W+R film simulation) Highlights -1 Shadows +1 (KM: +2) Sharpness +1 (KM: +2) - this change more to see the difference than any science. Dynamic Range (Auto) White Balance (Auto) Noise Reduction -2

Fujifilm X-T1 jpeg file of a man drinking in the Milk Bar, London

Generally, I'm really happy with the look. It's far more to my liking than JPEGs from my Nikon D700. The blacks in these shots aren't as dark as on the test with the X100s. If I were going to use these elsewhere I'd like to increase the contrast a little, so it could be my metering that was at fault on the first test. Maybe I'll give Kevin's settings another go.

If you're using the Fujifilm simulations I'd be interested in hearing the settings you're using?